Gizeh is a small library for Python which you can install using pip. It doesn’t have any official documentation, so you have to suffice to the small documentation on it’s Github Page. Before starting this tutorial, read the README file carefully, as you may confused later on. Now, let’s see what we want to create. A procedural texture of a textile. Maybe a denim, maybe another pattern. I don’t know. Right now we can’t afford to be picky. The output is entirely randomized, and if you aren’t happy with the texture, you can just run the code again.


Our texture

Not happy? Let’s run the code again (I’m using Pycharm to write and run this code, teaching you about setting up Python and a good IDE is beyond the scope of this tutorial):


But how? Simple:

1- A blue background.

2- 200 different groups of 50 circles that increase in alpha as they decrease in radius. colors are from rgb(200, 200, 200) to rgb(250, 250, 250).

3- Vertical and horizontal lines spaced together based on a coefficient of 0.01 and tilted by a random number between 1 and 8.

That’s it!

Let’s start. First, let’s setup a window, and a surface:


import gizeh as gz
import random

w = 640
h = 480

surface = gz.Surface(width=w, height=h, bg_color=(21/255, 96/255,189/255))

You can change w and h to change the height and the width. Now, let’s generate our radial gradient:


def circle_generator(x, y, r, c):
    i = r
    a = 0
    while i > 0:
        circle = gz.circle(r = i, xy=[x, y], fill=(c/255, c/255, c/255, a*0.70))
        i -= 1
        a += 1/2000

        circle.draw(surface)

Besides the location of the circles, the function accepts two other parameters: the radius, which decreases in each while loop, and the color, which we divide by 255 since in Gizeh, rgb is between 0 and 1. We increase the alpha (a) by adding 1/2000 to it in each iteration.  At the end, we draw the circle.

Now, let’s make a line generator:


def generate_lines(x1, y1, x2, y2, s, a):
    line = gz.polyline(points=[(x1, y1), (x1, y1), (x2, y2), (x2, y2)], stroke_width=s,
                         stroke=(0, 0, 0, a/255), fill=(0, 0, 0, a/255))

    line.draw(surface)

This one just generates one line, we’re actually drawing a polygon were its origin is (x1, y1) and ends at (x2, y2). If we add a randomized number to the second coordinates, we can have a mangled shape, which will come to use if we want to generate some other pattern. s is stroke, and a is alpha. We set the fill to black, but it’s useless, as we don’t have a fill.

Now, let’s draw 200 radial gradients on the screen:


for i in range(200):
    x = random.randint(0, w)
    y = random.randint(0, h)
    r = random.randint(20, 100)
    c = random.randint(200, 255)
    circle_generator(x, y, r, c)

we choose entirely random locations, a radius between 20 and 100, and a color between very light gray and white. Then we call the function.

Now, the lines!

s = random.randint(1, 3)
a = random.randint(50, 200)
coeff = 0.01

for i in range(w):
    tilt = random.randint(1, 8)
    generate_lines(w * (i * coeff), 0, w * (i * coeff) + tilt, h, s, a)



for i in range(h):
    tilt = random.randint(1, 8)
    generate_lines(0, h * (i * coeff), w, h  * (i * coeff) + tilt, s, a)

First, we choose a random opacity. and a random stroke. Then we set the coefficient to 0.01. You can experience with other coefficient values, but be warned that if you randomize it, it sometimes may take you 10 runs to get a right pattern. We then create a new random number in each iteration to use it as a tilt. We then generate the horizontal lines w times and vertical lines h times.

At the end, we save the file as a PNG. This is why you should use PyCharm, it shows the picture and updates it in a different window. Other IDEs don’t do that.


surface.write_to_png("only_bg.png")

Well, that’s it! You can experiment with it, use diagonal lines, creates woven textiles, et al. Hope you enjoyed it.